Six Things Students Can Do to Improve Their Mental Health

Six Things Students Can Do to Improve Their Mental Health

School, college and university can be a tough time for many students, meaning that their mental health can be put under extreme pressure. Here at Tutor Doctor we know that mental health is something that should be talked about openly and is definitely nothing to be ashamed of. A survey by the National Union of Students recently found that 78% of students had experienced mental health issues in the last year, with 54% saying they didn’t seek support. With this in mind, we’ve come up with six things students can do straight away in order to boost their mental health.

1.Structure
A really easy way to boost mental health is to have structure in your everyday life. Make sure you know how much work you have to do and when you’re going to do it, what time you have school or lectures and when your assignments are due in. Other easy ways to implement structure is to plan your evenings so you have free-time and work-time, and remember don’t go on social media sites whilst your working.

2.Exercise
Exercise is a super easy way to improve mental health. Get your heart rate up so you sweat every day. Whether it’s going to the gym, skipping in your bedroom or having a run outside, it will instantly give you a lift and make you feel better.

3. Reading
Reading is a brilliant release for stress and anxiety. Taking yourself into imagined world not only preoccupies your mind but also gives you a real break. Even if it is for half an hour a day it will be worth it.

4. Sleep
Making sure you have a regular sleep pattern is vital for good mental health. Make sure you have a set wake-up time and bedtime and stick to it. This will ensure that you get enough sleep and give time for your mind and body to rejuvenate. A great tip to help you fall asleep is to turn off your smart phone, tablet, TV or laptop before you go to bed. This gives your mind time to relax as bright lights can make it difficult for your brain to switch off.

5.Talk to your friends
This may sound obvious but talking to trustworthy friends about your problems can really help. Sharing your worries will instantly make you feel better and though a weight has been lifted from your shoulders. They might even be going through the same issues as you or be feeling the same way, meaning you can both help each other through it. As they say a problem shared is a problem halved.

6.Talk to Tutors
Remember that teachers and tutors are always there to talk to and offer advice. They will also be able to give you more information about the support that is available at your school, college or university.

For more information about the services that may be available to you, browse the NHS Child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) page.

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