Week 14 Buckinghamshire 11+

Week 14 Buckinghamshire 11+

Non-Verbal Reasoning

Warm up

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Answers

English

Literary Techniques

Alliteration

When we begin words with one letter. This makes words seem like they belong together, like a uniform.

It can also help your remember things:

Bob the Builder

Mickey Mouse

Baby boomer

Jabberywocky uses this technique a lot

It is important that you remember the name of this technique.

Another important technique is ononmatopoeia (said onomatopeeya)

This where we make a word out of a sound so that we can have sounds in our books! (You have to use your imagination a little!)
Boom, clap, slap, splash, crash, zoom.

There are some words you may not even realise are onomatopeoic they have been around for so long; think of words that relate to sound...

Babble, mumble, belch, yawn, gasp, shriek, whip, whisper, sprinkle, zip.

And no, there isn’t really a word ‘miaow,’ ‘woof,’ or neigh!

Here’s some practice:

Which words are onomatopoeic?
1) The drum went boom!

2) The man was gasping for air after his run.

3) The rain pitter-pattered on the window.

4) My boots squelched in the mud.

5) My heart thudded.

Answers

Comprehension

JABBERWOCKY

Lewis Caroll’s poem

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wade;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!"

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood.
And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

"And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!"
He chortled in his joy.

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

Circle the correct answer below. Remember to check back with passage.

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Maths

Ratio

A ratio tells you how much of one thing there is compared to another.

In the group of dinosaurs below there are two blue dinosaurs for every three red dinosaurs.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/z8kfnbk#zxm4rdm

This is a real recipe and I recommend it. I get my students to do this every year.

In a recipe for lemonade you use 1 cup of lemon juice, for 1 cup of sugar, for 6 cups of water.

It is written like this 1: 1: 6.

The order is important: if you use six cups of lemon juice or six cups of sugar, your drink won’t taste right!

Another recipe I have is for cup-cakes.

Take 4oz of flour, 4oz butter, 8oz of self-rising flour, 4 eggs. That is enough to make 16 cupcakes.

So, the ratio is 4:4:8:4

If you get that in the wrong order and use 8 eggs, you won’t end up with cupcakes, you’ll end up with an omelette!

What you can do, if you like, is only make half the recipe. You must divide EVERYTHING by 2, or the result may be weird!

So, the new ratio is?

ANSWER

2: 2: 4: 2

What if we didn’t want all of the dinosaurs below but they are only sold in the ratio below? If we simplify, we can have less. Look at the graphic below.

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So, we could just get 6:9 so 15 in total.

Or 2:3, just 5 in total.

They are also much easier to compare.

2:3 is easier to think of than 12:18.

Remember, the order is very important.

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If we were making a color, say purple, out of red and blue, we would need to get the amount exactly right, or it wouldn’t come out purple. Look at the interactive link below.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/z8kfnbk#zxm4rdm

Some children find it odd when their answer comes out as 2:3, but this is a new type of answer that you need to get used to when using ratio.

Proportion is when we compare a part to the whole thing.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zsy3qhv

We turned it into a fraction to get the proportion.

We can also turn it into a percentage. 100% is a whole thing.

Do you remember how to turn fractions into percentages?

You need to turn the denominator into 100, multiplying the number you have until you get 100. So long as you do the same to the numerator, you get a percentage.

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Answers

You can also try IXL, week 6, letter O. Remember you get 10 practice questions free every day!

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Next week

Verbal Reasoning, Non-Verbal Reasoning, Maths

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