Study techniques for auditory learners

Study techniques for auditory learners

Exams are almost here, with busy revision schedules underway for many students across the UK. At Tutor Doctor, we know that utilising revision techniques that compliment each student’s learning style can make a huge difference when it comes to retaining information. In this, the last installment of our three-part revision series, we’ve put together some of the best learning techniques for auditory learners.

Auditory learners

Auditory learners focus easily on sounds and have an excellent memory of what they’ve heard in a classroom or on a Dictaphone. Hearing information aloud often makes much more sense, allowing auditory learners to process and retain information more easily by using sound. In fact, in a recent survey found that 16% of students claimed they were auditory learners.

Studying with others or in groups

Studying with friends or in a group is going to work wonders for auditory learners. It means students can talk out loud and hear the information being discussed, making it much easier to remember. Finding others that have the same learning style and arranging study sessions together will also be useful as everyone can practice the same techniques together.

Reading out loud

Reading out loud is a simple but effective technique. If students are struggling to remember something tricky, then taking the time to recite it aloud and repeat the process as many times as necessary will be sure to help. For students completing practice essays, reading out the questions and answers will make it much easier to understand- just remember to write at the same time as speaking!

Dictaphones!

Taping lectures, lessons or recording revision notes on a Dictaphone is a great way to start building up audio revision material. When it then comes to revising, listening to those recordings whilst reviewing the appropriate notes is a great study tip as it provides double auditory input. Even better, these recordings can be listened to anywhere -- on the bus, in the car or on a walk!

Word Association

Word association is a fantastic way for auditory learners to study and remember facts or quotes. More specifically, mnemonic devices such as songs and rhymes can help automatically recall information when needed.

Avoid distractions

Auditory learners are prone to distractions, meaning it’s crucial for them to work or revise in a calm and peaceful environment, where the focus can be on studying. Avoid listening to music, but if silence isn’t ideal, try listening to music without words such as classical or post-rock -- according to experts this can boost productivity.

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