Why family time is important for your kids

Why family time is important for your kids

Most of us are busier than ever, with work, school, social activities and a growing to-do list. Sometimes this can mean important activities such as quality family time can be neglected and pushed to the back of the agenda. However, the benefits of spending time as a family are hard to ignore, which is why it’s crucial to make the time as often as you can. Not only can it have a positive effect on your child’s mental health but make a real difference in their general wellbeing and academic performance. Here are just a few more benefits to consider.

Bonding time

Spending quality time together as a family allows everyone to bond. Whether this is partaking in everyday activities or going on holiday, creating warm memories is so valuable for your kids. In fact, strong child-parent bonds are only formed through consistent communication and meaningful time spent together.

Happier kids

Even though the entire family benefits from being together, it can have really a positive effect on your kids’ general wellbeing and happiness. Just remember, it’s the quality of interactions not the quantity that really count. Making small changes when spending time as a unit can make all the difference. For example, putting aside distractions and listening to each other can help make everyone feel loved and appreciated.

Builds self-esteem

When children feel as though they’re valued by their parents and spend time together often, it helps build up a positive sense of self-worth. This self-esteem often translates across to their social and school lives. Even better, family time doesn’t have to be expensive - activities such as going for a walk or a bike ride hold just as much worth. The important part is spending time together and enjoying each other’s company.

Improved mental health

The importance of family time on your kids’ mental health is significant. Children who feel engaged and connected in their family dynamic are more likely to be sociable, perform better in school and have less behavioural issues. In fact, recent studies have even shown that teens who have infrequent family dinners are twice as likely to use tobacco and alcohol.

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