Helping your children make New Year’s resolutions

Helping your children make New Year’s resolutions

For many of us New Year means it’s time to reflect back on the last 12 months and resolve to do better in certain areas. Whether it’s exercise, diet or getting up earlier, there are lots of ways everyone can benefit from making resolutions. Your children especially can learn a lot about self-discipline and start to see the value in setting resolutions and goals. In fact, lots of kids find it a fun way to start the year. Here’s some ways you can help your children make their New Year’s resolutions for 2018.

Focus on the positives

Instead of focusing on the negatives from last year, try and keep resolution setting positive. For example: “I didn’t do very well at science” or “I could have studied harder” should be avoided. Instead try to encourage your kids to focus on goal setting and positive outcomes. Replace “I could have studied harder” with “I am going to study once a day for at least an hour and get more involved in class discussion.” In fact, there may be several different ways your child can accomplish a positive goal, so get them to mind map their ideas.  We guarantee that this way your kids will be more excited about their resolutions and will stick to them better.

Make suggestions, but let your kids choose

Even though you know your child best and the areas which could use a little improvement, it’s important to offer a few suggestions but ultimately let them decide. New Year’s resolutions should be your child’s own personal commitment – if they don’t feel as though they’re the ones setting the goal, chances are they won’t feel a strong desire to stick to it. Instead, we recommend providing some gentle guidance and encourage them to identify the areas they want to work on on their own.  

Display your resolutions

It’s a great idea for your kids to write down their resolutions and keep them visible. After all, out of sight, usually means out of mind. There’s a ton of creative ideas to choose from if you want to help you kids keep track of their newly set goals. Websites such as Pinterest really offer something for everyone - some parents make sticker charts, others put posters up around the house to stay motivated. Just choose the way that works best for them.

Make it a tradition

The easiest way to teach your children the importance of setting New Year’s resolutions is to make it a family tradition. Each year organise for everyone to sit down together and reflect on the last 12 months. Discuss accomplishments and goals individually but also as a family. We guarantee everyone will have a lot more fun this way, and it’s an added bonus having some accountability partners. You never know when some encouragement will be needed.

Keep the list small

It’s important for your kids to only choose one or two New Year’s resolutions at a time. If your child starts making a super long list, it will only make them feel overwhelmed and hesitant to start working on anything. Keep the list small and achievable so your children can succeed!

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